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Archive for September, 2009

Google.ings.

there is something refreshing about Google and its familiar advertising, familiar primary colors, clear familiar text, and just its basic simplicity. HOWEVER, designers at Google always seem to find innovative ways to change the Google headline to creative, fun, seasonal themes! I think it’s so innovative, and mostly because they seem to keep a tight reign on how different they can get when changing the now-famous headline. I wish more companies had the creative liscence, yet maintained their original-design dignity, when changing for the times. Here are some AMAZING seasonal ideas from Google: http://www.google.com/holidaylogos.html

Holiday Logo Design Ideas

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Let’s start with the definition of ‘logo’ from out esteemed Wikipedia:

A logo is a graphical element (ideogram, symbol, emblem, icon, sign) that, together with its logotype (a uniquely set and arranged typeface) form a trademark or commercial brand. Typically, a logo’s design is for immediate recognition.[1] The logo is one aspect of a company’s commercial brand, or economic or academic entity, and its shapes, colors, fonts, and images usually are different from others in a similar market. Logos are also used to identify organizations and other non-commercial entities.

Nobody (or teachers really) like Wiki but it has some decent info. Here are some tids that i found pretty interesting:

*** For instance loud primary colors, such as red, are meant to attract the attention of drivers on highways are appropriate for companies that require such attention. In the United States red, white, and blue are often used in logos for companies that want to project patriotic feelings. Green is often associated with the health and hygiene sector, and light blue or silver is often used to reflect diet foods. For other brands, more subdued tones and lower saturation can communicate reliability, quality, relaxation, or other traits.

*** AdBusters Media Foundation: The foundation describes itself as “a global network of artists, activists, writers, pranksters, students, educators and entrepreneurs who want to advance the new social activist movement of the information age. Adbusters’ sister organizations include R√©sistance √† l’Aggression Publicitaire and Casseurs de Pub in France, Adbusters Norge in Norway, Adbusters Sverige in Sweden and Culture Jammers in Japan.

https://www.adbusters.org/

Here are some funny ads that they ‘subverted’ from popular culture:

pretty neat, huh?

i thought so.

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Fast Food ConSternation

So I was in the drive-in at Sonic, yum, and I was reading the menu in a frenzy. I’m always in a frenzy at the drive-thru! Will I have enough time? Will I miss the one thing I wanted? Was there something better? Did I forget anything? Did I get the combo? Did I say no pickles? Did I ask for no cheese? AHHHHHHH. I call it: “Drive-Thru Overload,” and it happens to me all the time. Luckily, Sonic lets you sit in the drive-in until you are absolutely ready… even then there is a little hostile competition between cars that may/may not interfere with leisurely menu carrusing. Anyways, I was sitting there thinking about the graphic design of the menu. Is it orderly? Yes. But, could it be better? Duh.

Here’s what I was looking at (I took a picture for y’all):

… i can’t figure out this blogging thing, but i apparantly uploaded it to my media but it won’t show it. UGH!

After doing some research into drive-thru menus, I have concluded that the ones with the most words have to be the least effective. Exhibit A.

Who knows what I’d be ordering and what it’s supposed to look like? I like to have an idea what I’m about to order so that a) I don’t waste my money and b) I don’t end up with an ear on a bun or something. Thus, Sonic with all of its pictures might be the best option. Could someone graphically design a new menu? McDonalds and Wendy’s have added those new computer-like things to confirm your order, which really helps in case you forgot something… or they forgot it. Atleast battle “I-Swear-I-Ordered-It” is over and now we’re on to the post-order blues (when you forget to order that one thing you really wanted). Could a graphic designer help this industry?

Any ideas?

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